Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Foodiness

Archive for the tag “comfort food”

31-recipe challenge Day 21: Chicken and dumplings

Well, folks, we’re in the home stretch as far as posts about the recipe challenge go, now. This was my second-to-last day of cooking and third-to-last dish. (Yes, I promise, I’m all done now, I’m just still two days behind on blogging about it. I’m so looking forward to take-out tonight! No dishes!)

*********

I’m really glad I didn’t make this one the same week as the chicken pot pie.

Why?

Well, chicken and dumplings is, essentially, a deconstructed chicken pot pie. Personally, based on the way each dish turned out, I’d rather have the pot pie.

I’m not saying this one was bad, it just wasn’t as good as the pot pie. Again, I’m not really sure who (or what) is to blame here, but since I’m not in the business of bad-mouthing other hardworking food bloggers, I’ll take the fall on this one. Besides, this recipe came from Diane at Stylish Cuisine and her finished product looked all sorts of warm, happy and saucy.

I halved this recipe, but I halved everything, including the stew/sauce. I assumed that was the right way to do it, but were I to make this again, I would probably keep the full amount of sauce and halve just the actual chicken and dumplings.

chicken and dumplings

Why’s that? Well, when all was said and done, there was a serious lack of sauce/stew in the dish, making it more dumpling than liquid. And that stew base is supposed to be the best part (to me it is, anyway.) The dumplings didn’t really have anywhere to go in the scant amount of stew base, so they sort of blew up into one super-dumpling. (Any artists out there willing to create a rendition of the delicious and nutritious superhero “Super Dumpling” would be my new best friend.)

Somehow, despite cooking in liquid, my chicken also came out a bit tough and seemingly overdone, although I’m alone in this consensus. No one else that ate it seemed to agree; maybe it’s just my oversensitive, wisdom-toothless mouth talking.

Regardless, this wasn’t bad–I ate it for lunch the next day–but it wasn’t the comfy-cozy comfort food greatness it could have been. And yes, I am comparing it to the pot pie, which probably isn’t fair. It should stand on its own merit. But I can’t help it, they’re practically the same dish. I even “healthified” the dumplings a bit by making them with half whole-wheat and half all purpose flour, like the pot pie crust. I’m sorry (but not really) for turning chicken and dumplings into the shadow-cast little sister of chicken pot pie.

One day I’ll be a good cook and be able to write posts about how great and tasty my dish was rather than grasp at straws to find their virtues…I swear…

For some reason, this was just a tough week. But don’t worry, I went out on a high note! (You’ll see…)

 

Advertisements

31-recipe challenge Day 15: Chicken Pot Pie

There’s something so quintessentially wintery and cozy about chicken pot pie.  It’s really the ultimate winter comfort food.  And making my own lets me totally control what goes into it, unlike most of those frozen, pre-made ones from the store.

Chicken pot pie whole

Overall, this was a good recipe, though, of course, I skipped the mushrooms in lieu of an extra pour of chicken stock. Once it was all baked up, I did feel the whole thing could have benefited from some more salt, which is unusual for me, but nonetheless, an extra pinch of salt would’ve brought all the flavors out even more.

I used all white meat in my pot pie, breast specifically. I made chicken soup the same day (more to come on that later), so I used one of the breasts that cooked in the stock. (Multitasking!)

I really wish there was more I could say about this pot pie, other than Kevin loved it and I wish I had more, because it’s still cold and bitter and pot pie weather. But March is so close now, and I’m hoping the mid-Atlantic catches on that March means spring. (One can dream, right?) And I love the whole wheat crust instead of the typical white crust (not that the thought of topping it with biscuit dough hasn’t crossed my mind…yum.)

Chicken pot pie filling

I’m also still suffering from a bit of anesthesia hangover from my wisdom teeth surgery yesterday. On the good side, I’m in very little pain; I’ve only taken two Tylenol and none of the Vicodin the surgeon prescribed. On the downside, I’ve been super tired and groggy since yesterday, and there are solid chunks of time directly post-surgery that I remember NONE of.

I’ve been tucking into all the soup I prepped for myself last week–I’ll have a separate post about that coming soon.

 

31-Recipe Challenge Day 8: Banana Bread Oatmeal and Snow

As I mentioned yesterday, it snowed here over the weekend. I woke up Saturday to a blanket of white…that was plowed right up and over my car. The upside of moving from a house to an apartment is the lack of a driveway and walkway to shovel. The downside is I now park on the street and the snowplows plow our cars right in. So I did still have to spend Saturday morning clearing off and shoveling out some cars. And it was crazy windy, so I ended up looking more like I had jumped in the snow than shoveled it. (Have I mentioned I’m not a big fan of snow?)

But the upside to shoveling snow is getting to come inside after and warm up with some hot oatmeal and cocoa. So I made myself a hearty post-snow breakfast of banana bread oatmeal, courtesy of My Fat Heart.

Banana bread oatmeal and cocoa

I’ll be up front: I’m weird about banana. I like them, I eat them, I excitedly pair them with peanut butter. But banana bread? Banana chips? Most other banana-flavored or banana-inclusive things? No thanks. I’m picky about where my bananas can make an appearance. (Get your minds out of the gutter! No? Just me? Dammit.) So naturally, I was little worried to try out an oatmeal recipe that calls for mashed banana out of fear that I would not be in a banana mood when I decided to make this recipe. (I was. It’s all good.)

Actually, I like the idea of adding mashed banana to oatmeal to add sweetness and moisture. But for me, this oatmeal wasn’t a hit. It seized up before I got to eat it, making it unappealingly chewy, thick and sticky. In hindsight, I probably could have remedied this by just adding some more hot milk to it and stirring it in. Oh well. (Also, I used dairy skim milk, not almond milk like the original recipe states. I wonder now if the almond milk’s thickness would have helped the texture.)

(To be fair, though, the oatmeal may very well have started to solidify as I took shot after shot trying to get a decent, shadow-free photo. Eating this immediately after cooking, sans photo shoot, would probably have resulted in a much better oatmeal experience.)

One other thing–this had way too much cinnamon for me. Next time, I’d probably skip it in the topping and just sprinkle with brown sugar. (I also only had dark brown sugar on hand, not light, which has a more intense flavor and may have highlighted the cinnamon spice even more.)

Bottom line? I’ll try it again, no photo shoot, no extra cinnamon, maybe extra milk. And for the love of God, NOT with McCann’s steel cut oats. I tried it that way the first time in place of rolled oats (because I love my Irish oatmeal), but the ratios were not right and it cooked right onto the bottom of the pot. That was a fun cleanup.)

Therefore, if you do try this recipe (and please do! Just don’t take a thousand photos in front of a cold window first), FOLLOW IT! She knows what she’s talking about. Don’t be me.

Banana bread oatmeal and mocha on windowsill

And then snuggle up with a steamy bowl of oats and a big ol’ mug of cocoa, coffee, tea or some combination thereof. Happy snow day!

 

31-Recipe Challenge Day 7: Roasted Sweet Potato Risotto

I MADE RISOTTO! And it didn’t suck! Alas, risotto was a notorious downfall for the cheftestants on Top Chef, and I’m not sure this would save me from the wrath of Tom and Padma, but nonetheless, I made risotto on the first try and it wasn’t horrifically awful. As a matter of fact, it was downright edible! (Of course, I’m being modest…I’ve already tucked into the leftovers, so that’s always a good sign.) I also made brown butter for the first time, which also didn’t suck. As a matter of fact, I expected to need at least two tries to not burn it, but first time was a charm.  My apartment smelled delicious that night.

Sweet potato risotto 1

Cue happy dance number 3 of the month. (3? Or is it 4? I lost track…)

I didn’t just make any risotto, mind you. I made roasted sweet potato risotto from How Sweet It Is. This recipe basically combines all sorts of good things into one: risotto, which is obviously fabulous, sweet potatoes, bacon and cheese.

I was super-concerned during the cooking process that I was going to mess something up. If I didn’t feel like the stock and wine were absorbing at the right rate, I got worried. If I burned the garlic and over-toasted the rice, I freaked. (I mean, not that I did that…I totally did that. It still came out fine in the end.) Moral of the story? Don’t freak, you’re probably going to end up with a beautifully rich, creamy risotto at the end.

Cooking arborio rice

It made for a very good way to end the week and welcome in a snow storm–yup, we got hit by “Nemo,” though it wasn’t nearly as bad as what we’ve had in the past. And not having a driveway to shovel makes it even better. I also moved from a very quiet suburban street to a pretty busy local road, so we were plowed out before 9 am Saturday. That was nice.

So, the next time snow is coming your way (you can pretend if you live in a warm climate. Also, you can invite me over.), cook up a batch of creamy, wintery risotto, snuggle up with a glass of wine, and then head out and hit the bar before the snow really starts. Or you can just do the first part…(Yes, I did the latter, but granted, the bar’s only about eight blocks away and the snow didn’t even start til right before we left. Apparently Nemo’s a night owl.)

I feel like this night was the night I moved up a rank in the cooking world. Maybe I can call myself at least “intermediate” now. After all, I made brown butter AND risotto with it and both turned out on the first shot. Or maybe I’m just getting cocky. Either one.

Sweet potato risotto 2

 

Learning from our mistakes: 5-Cheese White Bean Macaroni and Cheese

Sometimes I try new things and they don’t always work.  Sometimes that means utter, throw it in the trash failure, and sometimes that means it came out okay, but not great. This is a story of the latter.

I had seen this recipe for white bean mac and cheese a while back and decided to tackle something similar. I was craving the ooey-gooeyness of mac and cheese but didn’t want to go completely off track, health-wise, so this seemed like the perfect compromise.

I didn’t have a whole lot of any one kind of cheese in my fridge, but I had a lot of different kinds of cheese, so I just ran with it. At the time, I though using about a tablespoon of cottage cheese would be a good idea to help get a creamy consistency.  Unfortunately, I learned the hard way that cottage cheese doesn’t really melt.  It stays kind of chunky and clumpy, which is sort of off-putting in a cheese sauce.  So, if I were to attempt this again (and I plan to!), I’d probably go with a tablespoon of cream cheese over the cottage cheese to ensure that creaminess is there.

Another mistake I learned from: garlic burns. Fast. And it makes your house smell. Brown garlic (as in burned) smells even stronger than just the regular cooked stuff. And it doesn’t make the other people in your house happy. Also, the flavor is INTENSE. Like, whoa baby, that’s garlic intense. (I contemplated throwing it out and starting over after burning the garlic, but since it was just brown and not completely charred, I decided to go with it. Next time, lightly cooked garlic or bust.)

So, yes, the final product was a bit too garlicky for my taste, and sort of a strange, overcooked garlic flavor. Also, I was probably a bit overzealous in my use of the white bean puree–I didn’t mind it, but the sauce was a bit grittier than a normal cheese sauce from the beans.  If you want to hide the white beans and get more of a traditionally smooth cheese sauce, go with less puree.  But, still, I could see the real potential in this dish, and so I still want to share it with you, with some adaptations to the recipe based on what I learned.

5-cheese white bean macaroni and cheese

Spiral pasta (or any shape you like)
2 tbs extra virgin olive oil
1 small garlic clove, minced or pressed
1/2 can white cannelini beans, rinsed
1 tbs butter
1 tbs all-purpose flour
1/2 cup to 1 cup skim milk (depends how thin/thick you want your sauce)
1 tbs cream cheese
2 deli slices or 1 handful shredded sharp cheddar cheese
2 slices American cheese
1 handful shredded provolone cheese
1 handful grated parmesan cheese
Dried mustard seed
Paprika
Fresh ground black pepper

1. Boil the pasta in a large saucepan with a tablespoon of olive oil to prevent sticking.  When the pasta is cooked al dente, drain and set aside. While the pasta boils, puree the white beans with a little bit of water or oil, if necessary, to get a smooth consistency.
2. In the same saucepan, heat the other tablespoon of olive oil. Add the garlic and cook through (until still white, not dark brown!)
3. Add the butter, let it melt, and mix in the flour to create a roux.
4. Once incorporated, add the milk and let it simmer and heat through. Add the cream cheese and stir it into the milk sauce until it melts.
5. Add the white bean puree, 1 tablespoon at a time, and stir to incorporate into the sauce.
6. Add each cheese, one at a time, and stir until melted. (Eyeball this–if you need more or less, adjust to that. And taste along the way!)
7. Add a few sprinkles of mustard and paprika, to taste. Grind in the black pepper, to taste.
8. When the sauce is smooth and reaches the desired consistency, add the pasta back to the pot and stir well to coat.  Add more seasonings, if necessary.
9. Turn the oven on to Broil. Pour the macaroni and cheese into a baking dish or into individual ramekins and top with more grated Parmesan and paprika.
10. Broil macaroni and cheese for 3-8 minutes or until the Parmesan topping begins to bubble. Remove and let cool for a few minutes before serving.

This recipe is great to just lighten up and healthify regular mac and cheese, but it’s also great for kids! You can sneak this white bean puree into their favorite dish and they won’t even know it’s there! Instant fiber, protein and vitamins–and they’re not the wiser! Ha!

This is also a great no-bake cheat to still create that baked macaroni and cheese flavor.  The Parmesan topping gets nice and crispy while the pasta inside stays super creamy and cheesy. I’ve never made a baked-style mac and cheese before–I’ve always made it with a cheese sauce and let it be, like a homemade version of the boxed stuff. But this time around, I wanted to try that baked casserole-style without actually baking it. Broiling it for a few minutes was a quick way to achieve that without actually sitting around and waiting for it to bake. (Cause I’m hungry!) And you know what? Yes, the burned garlic was a bit overwhelming. But with the crispy cheese topping and the ooey-gooey inside, this was still pretty darn delicious! Nothing beats a good mac and cheese, and the addition of white beans and skim milk instead of whole milk or cream makes this (almost) guilt-free!

Post Navigation

In the kitchen with Kath

Old favorites...New discoveries. Fresh and easy!

Heike Herrling

...but it tasted good

Danny's Kitchen

Food that creatively inspires...

Chicken Soup for the Sole

Cooking with no one but a pan and a plan.

Kicked,Bitten, & Scratched

writings from the mind and heart of a veterinary technician

Bookery & Cookery

A catalogue of my literary and culinary pursuits and perusals.

...our traveling without moving!...

Not just another WordPress.com site!

Bucket List Publications

Indulge- Travel, Adventure, & New Experiences

Communications & Legal Studies

Keep me posted @ IC Library

Ink-Drained Kvetch

Journalism, media and work in the digital age

Ethical Martini

The home of media ethics and martinis

WordPress.com

WordPress.com is the best place for your personal blog or business site.

Raven Montana B.

The meaning of it all.

%d bloggers like this: