Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Foodiness

Archive for the tag “challenge”

31-Recipe Challenge Day 8: Banana Bread Oatmeal and Snow

As I mentioned yesterday, it snowed here over the weekend. I woke up Saturday to a blanket of white…that was plowed right up and over my car. The upside of moving from a house to an apartment is the lack of a driveway and walkway to shovel. The downside is I now park on the street and the snowplows plow our cars right in. So I did still have to spend Saturday morning clearing off and shoveling out some cars. And it was crazy windy, so I ended up looking more like I had jumped in the snow than shoveled it. (Have I mentioned I’m not a big fan of snow?)

But the upside to shoveling snow is getting to come inside after and warm up with some hot oatmeal and cocoa. So I made myself a hearty post-snow breakfast of banana bread oatmeal, courtesy of My Fat Heart.

Banana bread oatmeal and cocoa

I’ll be up front: I’m weird about banana. I like them, I eat them, I excitedly pair them with peanut butter. But banana bread? Banana chips? Most other banana-flavored or banana-inclusive things? No thanks. I’m picky about where my bananas can make an appearance. (Get your minds out of the gutter! No? Just me? Dammit.) So naturally, I was little worried to try out an oatmeal recipe that calls for mashed banana out of fear that I would not be in a banana mood when I decided to make this recipe. (I was. It’s all good.)

Actually, I like the idea of adding mashed banana to oatmeal to add sweetness and moisture. But for me, this oatmeal wasn’t a hit. It seized up before I got to eat it, making it unappealingly chewy, thick and sticky. In hindsight, I probably could have remedied this by just adding some more hot milk to it and stirring it in. Oh well. (Also, I used dairy skim milk, not almond milk like the original recipe states. I wonder now if the almond milk’s thickness would have helped the texture.)

(To be fair, though, the oatmeal may very well have started to solidify as I took shot after shot trying to get a decent, shadow-free photo. Eating this immediately after cooking, sans photo shoot, would probably have resulted in a much better oatmeal experience.)

One other thing–this had way too much cinnamon for me. Next time, I’d probably skip it in the topping and just sprinkle with brown sugar. (I also only had dark brown sugar on hand, not light, which has a more intense flavor and may have highlighted the cinnamon spice even more.)

Bottom line? I’ll try it again, no photo shoot, no extra cinnamon, maybe extra milk. And for the love of God, NOT with McCann’s steel cut oats. I tried it that way the first time in place of rolled oats (because I love my Irish oatmeal), but the ratios were not right and it cooked right onto the bottom of the pot. That was a fun cleanup.)

Therefore, if you do try this recipe (and please do! Just don’t take a thousand photos in front of a cold window first), FOLLOW IT! She knows what she’s talking about. Don’t be me.

Banana bread oatmeal and mocha on windowsill

And then snuggle up with a steamy bowl of oats and a big ol’ mug of cocoa, coffee, tea or some combination thereof. Happy snow day!

 

Advertisements

31-Recipe Challenge: Day 3–Super Bowl Sunday!

If you remember my Super Bowl post from last year, you know I like to throw a Super Bowl party. This year was no different, except Kevin hosted and I had even better recipes to work with.

The Super Bowl menu? Beer and bacon butter beans, four-cheese macaroni and cheese and pumpkin pie bread pudding. Plus, Kevin made chicken fajitas and pigs in blankets.

Yes, this was a far departure from Day 2’s vegetarian recipes.

On to the recipes! First let’s start with the one I know you’re all looking at–Beer and Bacon Butter Beans. Let me repeat that one. Beer. And Bacon. Can you think of a better football food? I used this recipe from Crepes of Wrath and pretty much didn’t change a damn thing.

Despite the beer and bacon (or should I say, THANKS TO the beer and bacon), this is actually a very complex and sophisticated side dish, especially thanks to the whole sprig of rosemary that goes in. But seriously, just in case you had any doubt that beans slow-cooked in beer and bacon fat would be delicious, these were drool-worthy. I’ve never appreciated a plate of beans so much. And puff-pastry wrapped pigs in a blanket were a much better franks-and-beans accompaniment than plain old hot dogs.

Beer and bacon butter beans

As much of a bacon lover as I am (and I’m a huge bacon lover), I rarely cook it. Sunday I cooked it. A lot of it. 8 thick-cut strips, to be exact. And I chopped it first. I never want to do that again. Trying to cut through thick, chewy, raw bacon fat can make you never want to eat bacon again. (OK, that’s not true. But it doesn’t make you want to prep it again.)

But once that starts cooking, it’s a whole different story. The salty, smoky, bacon-y smell fills the kitchen, and all is right with the world.

Then, you strain out the bacon and cook the beans IN THE BACON FAT. Add chicken stock, lemon juice, honey, a whole bottle of malty amber ale (I used Sam Adams Boston Ale), spices and a sprig of rosemary, and pop that bad boy in the oven for a solid two hours. Then top with crispy bacon. 1) your house will smell amazing and 2) what comes out at the end of those two hours is well worth the wait.

I can’t believe I’m waxing poetic about baked canellini beans, but these beans were off-the-wall good. Granted, cook anything in bacon fat and beer and it will probably be off-the-wall good.

I’ll put it to you another way: my friend J, who still doesn’t even consider beans a viable food group, said these were good. That’s, like, Kevin loving the sweet potato tacos huge! (This has been a pretty good weekend!) Heck, the fact that he even willingly ATE the beans was a good enough compliment for me.

UPDATE: In hindsight, I realize I skipped the very last step of the recipe, which is to stir in a tablespoon of unsalted butter once the beans come out of the oven. Oh well, I didn’t miss it.

For dinner, I made Four-Cheese Baked Rigatoni from How Sweet It Is. I’ve made TONS of macaroni and cheese in my day–it’s almost become a staple for me–but this one was unique. In addition to cheddar, fontina and gruyere, this mac and cheese uses 1/3 cup of mascarpone, which is super luscious and creamy and smooth. And, as she warns, does give the mac and cheese extra oiliness, though not in a bad way. I’ve had mac and cheese like this before, and the extra oil actually lent itself well to reheating. It’s super gooey and cheesy. I used fat rigatoni noodles, like the recipe originally called for, which trapped lots of extra cheese sauce inside.

3-cheese mix

Come. To. Mama.

Although, I didn’t have any panko bread crumbs on hand, so I used regular whole wheat ones, which were fine. I also subbed a pinch of dried mustard seed for the nutmeg, since one of my friends in attendance has a nutmeg allergy. (The goal is to not kill people.)

One interesting thing about this day was that a sort of theme emerged: one pot wonders that I turned into two-pot wonders. You see, both the beans and the mac and cheese were supposed to go from stove to oven in the same cooking vessel: the beans in an oven-safe pot or deep pan, the macaroni in a cast iron skillet. I do not own either of those things (sadly), so for the beans, I cooked everything in a deep pan and transferred into a covered deep casserole dish to bake. I cooked the macaroni and cheese in the same deep pan and transferred to a traditional casserole dish to bake. I really need to get my hands on a cast iron skillet, because as ooey-gooey and lovely as that mac and cheese was, I bet it would be incredible in cast iron.

Mac and cheese

Then came dessert. Let’s just say I’m really glad someone brought cookies. I was probably the least impressed with this of everyone who ate it, but then again, I am always my own worst critic. I’m also picky about my bread pudding. I made this gorgeous-looking Pumpkin Pie Bread Pudding with Bourbon Icing from Eats Well With Others. (Well, hers was gorgeous-looking.)

It wasn’t a terrible recipe, I think I just executed it wrong. Though granted, three pounds of butternut squash to one pound of bread in a bread pudding does seem a tad imbalanced. I’d probably recommend trying something closer to a one-to-one ratio.

When the finished product came out of the oven (after it baked for way longer than called for yet barely felt done), there were more chunks of hard, raw squash than soft, melty baked ones. And the inside was decidedly, well, mushy. Too mushy for my taste. Not so bad for a bread pudding, but, like I said, I’m picky. I feel like if this was perhaps baked in individual-sized ramekins rather than one large springform, it would be more up my alley–lots of crispy outside and a semi-liquid center that’s still mostly baked.

There are a few things I think contributed to my underwhelming result: For one, I’m assuming I didn’t pre-cook the squash long enough on the stove, though I feel like I let it go even longer than the recipe called for. Also, while the recipe called for a 10-inch springform, I only had a 9 1/2-inch. So although I left some filling behind,  perhaps I still overstuffed the pan, leading to the longer-than-called for baking time.

I also made a couple of *slight* tweaks to the recipe, but I doubt they were disaster inducing: again, I cut the nutmeg so as not to send anyone to the hospital, and I subbed one cup of almond milk and two cups of regular milk (1%) for the three cups of almond milk because I didn’t have enough on hand.

Nonetheless, this is definitely one I won’t be making again, even though Kevin wants me to re-attempt it with apples in place of the squash. This one brought me back down to earth a little bit–I was getting pretty confident in my baking skills after the pizza dough victory on Day 1, but this proved I’m really still not a baker. I’m gonna stay on the stove top where I belong.

However, it wasn’t all a bust. There was that bourbon icing. Oh man, that icing. I don’t even like bourbon and I couldn’t stop stealing tastes of this stuff. Which was bad, because I’m on antibiotics and not allowed to have alcohol!

Pumpkin pie bread pudding w/ bourbon icing

But if you need a dessert topping for, well, pretty much anything, throw this together! A stick of butter, 2 cups confectioner’s sugar and 2 tablespoons bourbon. Whisk and imbibe. And to get it more glaze-y and less icing-y, just pop it in the microwave for 30 seconds or so.

Because, dude, you want this icing on EVERYTHING. It was pretty good on the cookies, I was told. (I had eaten enough off the spoon by that point, I figured it was better if I cut myself off.)

I’m exhausted just writing this, so it’s no surprise I nearly forgot to cook on Monday. (Don’t worry, I did!)

31-Recipe Challenge: Day 1 — Kicking it off!

Well, folks, the day has finally arrived–I have officially started  my one-month, 31-recipe challenge! Since I’ve been sick for the past week (battling an ear and throat infection punctuated with cold-like symptoms, yay winter), I started off slow, but delicious. My first recipe I tackled for this challenge–sausage and pepper pizza!

Sausage pizza 1

Now, I’m from New Jersey, where sausage and peppers can be found in every corner pizza joint (and you can bet they’ll be good, too!) They’re not usually my first choice, but let me tell you, this pizza rocks. I’m rethinking sausage and peppers now.

One great thing I learned from this recipe: making pizza dough from  scratch is super-easy. Like, crazy, crazy easy. Literally takes five, maybe 10 minutes, not counting the time for it to rise.  I don’t think I’ll be buying pre-made pizza dough anymore, it’s just not worth it.

Let’s take a minute here and let this sink in: I. made. homemade. dough. And it didn’t suck.  The non-baker inside me is freaking out and doing a happy dance! (And possibly a literal happy dance occurred at the time, as well. Not ashamed.)

The pizza got the stamp of approval from my toughest critic, the sausage pizza aficionado, if you will. (AKA…Kevin loved it!)

I *very, very* slightly modified this recipe from Joy the Baker for the pizza.  The main modification I made was using all-purpose flour in place of bread flour in the dough recipe, because, well, I’m not likely to use much bread flour again, so having five pounds of it seemed excessive. Frankly, though, the AP flour worked fine. I also used mild Italian sausage (patties, not links, since there was no casing) instead of spicy, because I have a low heat tolerance and actually wanted to be able to eat my pizza. As it was, I was reaching for the water anytime I took a bit with a little too much red pepper flake on it. (And there wasn’t much.)

Sausage pizza 2

I totally plan on making this one again, and keeping homemade pizza dough on hand in my freezer. It was so quick to make, even on a rushed post-work Friday evening, yet WAY beats any fast-food and even beats great pizza shop sausage pizza. Possibly because even the best Jersey pizza joints don’t usually put fresh bell peppers and arugula on their pizza.

Consensus: Day 1 a success.  The fun continues today with sweet potato tacos with avocado and apple, pomegranate and kale salad. And I’m getting really crazy tomorrow, combining the recipe challenge with a Super Bowl party! Yes, I may have the best-fed Super Bowl guests this side of Baltimore (see what I did there?).

See you soon for Day 2!

An Anniversary and an Announcement!

I can’t even believe it, but Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Foodiness is ONE YEAR OLD today! Holy cow!

One year ago today, I decided, partially on a whim, to start a food blog. My life wasn’t where I wanted it to be, so I figured, why not do something I want, then? Something that’s entirely in my control.

Looking back, a year doesn’t seem that long. But then when I look at where I was a year ago compared to where I am today, it seems like an eternity. A year ago, I was out of work, so I was serving at a Cuban restaurant full-time. While I loved my coworkers and the atmosphere and even some of the customers, overall I hated the job. I was unhappy. And I remember sitting in front of the heating vent in my old house, watching the Food Network, which inspired my very first post.

Today, a year later, I am working full-time (at my old job, in political polling), I’ve moved out of the house I grew up in and I am looking into moving again.

Hurricane Sandy happened, and I learned to truly be thankful for what I have and to count my blessings. We were incredibly lucky–we only lost power for a few days and a few (recovered) pieces of siding off our chimney. Walking out your door and seeing the extent of the destruction right in front of you, seeing beaches you grew up on decimated, is an unimaginably eye-opening experience. It’s easy to forget the fragility in life.

So, clearly, some major life changed have happened this year, and this blog was one of them. So here’s to 2013 at LLPF–it can only get even better!

*********

But now, on that note, I have a big birthday announcement to make! I’m taking on a new project here at the blog, and I figured there’s no better time to announce that than on the first anniversary!

Starting next month, I am going to undertake a 31-recipe challenge. Over the month of February, I will cook each and every dish on this list (thank you, Buzzfeed!) I will not make any more than *minor* substitutions. That is, even though I don’t like beets, I will make and try the beet salad. Even though I rarely eat fish and have never, ever prepared it, I will make miso-glazed cod. Because, when all is said and done, I might just discover that I enjoyed it!

I’m doing this for several reasons:
1. These recipes look damn delicious.
2. Accountability and a constant content source–I have been far too intermittent with this blog at times, between all the other things going on in my life (work, moving, Sandy, repeatedly involving myself in theater productions [sorrynotsorry]), but this will give me a) a consistent flow of recipes and experiences to blog about and b) accountability. I said I’m going to do this, and I will!
3. An opportunity to expand my horizons, both in the kitchen and at the table–There are plenty of things in here I have never, ever cooked before (braised short ribs, most desserts, soup) and things I never eat/don’t like/haven’t tried. But by cooking all of these recipes, as is, I will be learning new things in the kitchen and trying new foods or rediscovering old foods I didn’t think I liked. And if I still don’t like it in the end, so be it. But I may discover I like things I didn’t before.

So, there you have it. I know the list says “31 Things to Cook in January,” but I’m waiting to start until February because, well, it’s already 10 days into January, so that’s valuable time lost. Also, I’m starting tech week for a play this weekend (yeah, yeah, another one!) so my cooking time will be pretty much minimal.

I hope you’re all as excited for this as I am! I can’t wait to start!

The Great Leftover Challenge: Take One

A blog I follow regularly, Danny’s Kitchen, posted a rather fun and interesting challenge that he is calling “The Great Leftover Challenge.”  The rules of the game are:

  • Start with a leftover ingredient in your fridge, freezer or pantry.
  • Create something new that you’ve never made before.
  • Don’t use a recipe, be creative and just “wing it” at that moment.
  • It can be for breakfast, lunch, dinner or a snack and any serving size.
  • It can be savory and/or sweet.
  • Everyone is welcome so spread the word!

Well, how could I not try that? So, I scrounged around in my fridge and discovered the base for my first leftover challenge attempt: Mom’s meatloaf. I’ll tell you, it looks a little gross (cause leftover loaves of cold ground meat often do), but my mother’s meatloaf is probably second only to my own (I’m very, very proud of my meatloaf!) So this makes for a pretty delicious leftover.

Mmm, yummy!

I looked at this meatloaf and decided to attempt a soup/sauce/chili-like concoction. So I dug through my fridge, shelves and pantry to gather up these ingredients:

The ingredients for today's challenge

I started by sweating a little bit of red onion and a garlic clove in a splash of

Sweat it out (garlic and onions, that is).

extra virgin olive oil and then added some frozen broccoli and cauliflower that had been relegated to the bottom of my freezer. Once the veggies thawed out, I chopped up the meatloaf and added it to the pan with some more olive oil, salt and black pepper.

Next, I added the liquids: tomato soup (pre-made, yes, but the idea here was to use only leftovers or things

Added the liquid--tomato sauce and white wine

I already had on hand) and a (generous) splash of white wine, plus some more seasoning. Cook until everything heats through, simmering for a few minutes–also let it simmer to keep it warm/reheat it. I also had some leftover brown and basmati rice, so I mixed those together to serve the sauce/chili-like mixture over.

It came out looking pretty…mushy. And brown. It tasted good, but I don’t think I’ll be submitting this one to the contest. It just kind of looks, well…gross.  I think I was wrong to attempt to make meatloaf into something besides what it is–there are some things you just don’t mess with, and Mom’s meatloaf might be on that list. (Along with the leftover coq au vin in my fridge–that’s pretty much meant to be eaten straight.)

It kind of looks like chili, but kind of tasted like meat sauce. You know, meat sauce with meatloaf in it.

Not a bad quick meal, but not what I’d call a kitchen success either. Hence, this was leftover challenge take one. Must keep trying!

By the way, head to Danny’s blog to enter the Great Leftover Challenge yourself if you think you can whip up a mean leftover dish!

Post Navigation

In the kitchen with Kath

Old favorites...New discoveries. Fresh and easy!

Heike Herrling

...but it tasted good

Danny's Kitchen

Food that creatively inspires...

Chicken Soup for the Sole

Cooking with no one but a pan and a plan.

Kicked,Bitten, & Scratched

writings from the mind and heart of a veterinary technician

Bookery & Cookery

A catalogue of my literary and culinary pursuits and perusals.

...our traveling without moving!...

Not just another WordPress.com site!

Bucket List Publications

Indulge- Travel, Adventure, & New Experiences

Communications & Legal Studies

Keep me posted @ IC Library

Ink-Drained Kvetch

Journalism, media and work in the digital age

Ethical Martini

The home of media ethics and martinis

WordPress.com

WordPress.com is the best place for your personal blog or business site.

Raven Montana B.

The meaning of it all.

%d bloggers like this: