Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Foodiness

Archive for the month “February, 2013”

31-recipe challenge Day 20: Butterscotch pudding and Liebster Blog Award

Before we get started, I’d like to note that it is February 28, and it is the final day of my 31-recipe challenge, and my final day of cooking. I have a few more posts to get out to be all caught up, but this is it. I want it on record that I HAVE made all 31 (well, 30) recipes in the 28 days of February. In the words of Top Chef, at the end of today it’s “knives down, hands up.” Done-zo.

But until then…

I was so excited to make this pudding. Butterscotch pudding…are there any two more beautifully paired words in the English language?

Butterscotch pudding, when done right, is one of those things you find yourself daydreaming about, craving at any hour. Basically, it’s heaven in a bowl…

…until I lay my hands on it. I had such high hopes for this one, and it came out, well, a flop. Now, the recipe from Jennifer at Foodess is not to blame; her pudding looked DIVINE. My ineptitude with anything remotely dessert-y is to blame here. It’s a vicious curse, really…a woman with a sweet tooth as voracious as mine can’t make dessert. That’s irony. (I’m 0 for 2 on puddings here; they are clearly not my forte. Remember the bread pudding?)

To be honest, I have no idea where this began going downhill. I followed the recipe exactly (I didn’t even halve it!), and when I put the finished pudding in the fridge, it seemed fine.  But when I went to taste-test hours later, the texture was totally off-putting. It was gritty, grainy and curdled (ugh!).The one good thing, at least, was the flavor. (Thank you very much, Johnnie Walker Black Label. Good scotch=good butterscotch.)

butterscotch puddingIt still looked nice. I can pretend, can’t I?

Sure, I had encountered some curdling through the cooking process, but I didn’t freak…Jenn said that may happen, and if so, just our through a strainer before storing in the fridge. I guess mine wasn’t fine-meshed enough, or the curdling continued during refrigeration. I’m not sure. As for the grittiness…I got nothing. The caramel/butterscotch base (i.e., the molten sugar) was smooth and creamy, not grainy and sugary, so that’s not to blame. I’m out.

My one true disaster actually occurred early on. My successful caramel was actually my second attempt–my first attempt burnt to a crisp and filled my apartment with smoke. My eyes were burning, my dog was whimpering, I was running around half-blinded to open all the windows in the vicinity. At one point, I thought turning on the ceiling fan in the kitchen would help, but instead it just blew the burnt-sugar smoke into the living room, the foyer, the hallway. The dog and I took refuge in the bathroom (the only safe place) until we could breathe and see again. That was tragic, and nearly ruined the saucepan. (Two days of soaking, scrubbing and boiling water later, it’s like new!)

Needless to say, I watched round two like a hawk–at exactly that five-minute mark, off the heat. And it was lovely.

Anyway, let’s move on from this disaster that was (not) butterscotch pudding.

On Tuesday, I received the Liebster Blog Award from Sherry at Cafe Vita! I’m so excited! My little blog finally got noticed, and this is my first-EVER blogging award! The Liebster Blog Award is given to new bloggers that only have about 200 followers. “Liebster” is German for dearest, loveliest or favorite.

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There are some rules to accepting this award:
1. Each awarded blogger will post 11 random facts about themselves
2. 11 questions provided by the sender have to be answered
3. 11 new bloggers have to be chosen to which the award will be passed on
Go to their pages, tell them about the award and pass on the link to your post!
So it is kind of a blogger chain mail. This is a nice way to hep promote new blogs and to  get to know the owners.

So here it goes: 11 random facts about me:
1. I graduated Rutgers University in New Brunswick, NJ, with a degree in Journalism and Media Studies and a minor in Spanish.
2. While there, I also seriously considered minoring in dance (and auditioned to).
3. I currently live with my mother and my English Pointer named Nikki, and occasionally my younger sister. Four months ago, we moved out of the house we lived in for 21 years.
4. But, within the next two months, I will be living with my boyfriend Kevin and his/our yellow lab, Mackenzie.
5. I hate mushrooms.
6. I’ve lived in five different towns in New Jersey and one city in Spain (Valencia).
7. I am absolutely terrified of needles and crickets.
8. I’m very short. I’m just barely 5’1″ with shoes on.
9. By day, I work as a writer and web site administrator for a national political and  public opinion polling company.
10. I’ve been a dancer since I was three years old.
11. I dye my hair. I’m a natural brunette, but dye it red.

So now is the time to pass this award along!
I looked through Facebook, Twitter and WordPress to find up-and-coming blogs I enjoy and who’s work I want to promote. I noticed these blogs and would like to pass the award on to them.  This is a vehicle to help you connect with other new bloggers and to mutually encourage one another.  Have fun! (Confession: I may or may not be fudging a bit, since I’m not entirely sure how many followers some of these blogs have.)

Treats and Trinkets (so many sweets! I’ll leave the desserts to her! And she’s a Jersey girl!)
Our Dinner Table (another Jersey girl! You know I love it!)
Down-Home South Jersey (THREE Jersey girls! Clearly NJ is the place for awesome food bloggers!)
Heike Herrling …but it tasted good (such beautiful, creative dishes!)
Crostini and Chianti (is that a blog title or an invitation? Because, yes please!)

These were the 11 questions asked by Sherry at Cafe Vita:
1.  Where do you live NOW? 15 minutes away from my old house, right on the Jersey Shore
2.  What made you decide to blog? I was unhappy with where my life was 13 months ago, and I wanted to do something for me. I had toyed with the idea for a few weeks, so I just decided to jump in and do it.
3.  What was the number one tool that helped you get started? I’m not really sure how to answer that…Wordpress?
4.  Share a blog address that INSPIRED you. The Lean Green Bean. She’s an inspirational health, fitness, food and nutrition blogger. She gets me off my couch! http://www.theleangreenbean.com/
5.   What are your goals for your blog? I hope to reach out to people who share my passion for food, cooking and nutrition and I hope to expand my readership beyond my parents and my really bored friends.
6.  How do you take your photos? Badly! Haha…on an iPhone (I knoooow). I try to set up some good lighting and staging, usually on my well-lit end table in my living room. Then I edit in PicStitch.
7.  How much time do you spend per day/week on your blog or Facebook interactions? That really varies. This month, about an hour a day. Other times, much less.
8.  What do you like most in a blog post from others? Humor, relatability, honesty, personal anecdotes and pretty photos.
9.  What are other hobbies that you have besides blogging? Theater and dance, nutrition, yoga
10. Favorite blog? Peas and Crayons…she nails the factors I mentioned in #8, and sometimes I believe we’re kindred spirits.
11. Favorite ingredient? That’s such a tough call…fresh basil or cilantro or ginger. And red wine. And black pepper. And peas. OK, that was more than one…

Congratulations to all the recipients, it was well deserved! Now, here are my 11 questions for YOU!

1. What’s the best advice you would like to receive from an established blogger?
2. What’s the best advice you would give to a new blogger?
3. What is your favorite cocktail/beverage?
4. Favorite guilty pleasure food?
5. Favorite television show?
6. Why did you start blogging?
7. If you could have dinner with anyone from history, dead or alive, who would it be and what would you ask?
8. Who’s your main taste tester/critic/support system?
9. What’s your occupation?
10. What’s the biggest disaster you’ve ever had in the kitchen?
11. It’s almost spring! What’s the thing your most excited about heading into spring?

Now it’s your turn! Copy and paste these questions into a new post and answer them, and then pass along the award to 11 more well-deserving bloggers! Have fun!

And a major thanks again to Sherry from Cafe Vita for passing this award to me!

31-recipe challenge Day 19: Oscars and short ribs

What better, swankier dish to serve on Oscars Sunday than red-wine braised short ribs? There isn’t one, really.

These braised short ribs, courtesy of Diane, A Broad (love the blog name!) might be hands-down one of the best things I have ever cooked, ever. After just three hours in the oven, these were the richest, most fall-apart ribs I’ve ever had. (Enough so that two days post-surgery I was even able to eat them!). They seem scary and complicated and oh-so-fancy, but really it’s just a lot of throwing stuff in a pot and letting it go.

short ribs 1

There are several steps, between searing, slow-roasting, separating and reducing, but no one step is particularly intimidating on its own. It’s the sum of its parts that’s so seemingly overwhelming, really, but once you break it down you realize it’s really not all that bad. It’s downright doable! And I would totally do this again.

Also, I’m not sure I’ll ever eat a cooked carrot that’s not braised in red wine again. Even the carrots were melt-in-your-mouth.

I served these over some instant polenta, much like Diane, though I pumped mine up with pecorino romano and little light cream. Add a ton of chives and more sauce and dig in and don’t look back. Thank me later.

Despite the fact that I’m going home to cook dinner tonight (duh), all I want to do right now is eat leftover short ribs straight out of the fridge. Short rib appetizer, anyone?

short ribs 2

Short ribs, Seth MacFarlane, Les Miserables…it’s like everything I love just came together to make me the happiest girl in the world. Add in Jennifer Lawrence being adorable as ever while winning Best Actress (and HOW sweet was it when both Hugh Jackman AND Bradley Cooper ran up to help her when she fell?? Such gentlemen!) and it was a pretty great Sunday. The only thing that would’ve made it better would have been a big glass of the malbec I used to braise the ribs. Curse you, amoxycillin! I thought we were over.

 

31-recipe challenge Day 18: Soup Round-up

As I’ve mentioned before, I had my wisdom teeth out on Friday, and so, in anticipation of that, I spent a lot of last week prepping most of the soups on the recipe list. I could also rename this post, “Why an immersion blender is my best friend.”

First, I made this vegan herbed carrot soup from 10th Kitchen. This soup is fantastic. It’s light, it’s fresh and it’s so, so healthy. It’s helpful to have around when you can’t chew any real fruits or vegetables–it gets me my veggies! I’ve been eating the soup hot, but I’m sure it would be really refreshing cold, as well, like a carrot gazpacho.

Carrot soup

This soup is the first installment of “Why an immersion blender is my best friend.” I actually forgot I even had an immersion blender until I moved, and in the process of packing up the kitchen came across a really old one that I assumed was broken. But we plugged the thing in and, I’ll be damned, it worked! That was a great day. Now I’ve checked one thing off my ever-growing list of kitchen gadgets. Plus, it saves me the inevitable burns from pouring hot soup contents into a blender and back again.

I also cooked up a batch of ginger-chicken soup from Bon Appétit. The recipe called for six quarts of water to three pounds of chicken, which all the commenters said was WAY too much. I halved the recipe to begin with, so I was only using about a pound and a half of chicken (once I removed the breast that cooked in the initial stock to use in my chicken pot pie), so I cut the water down to eight cups to result in a richer tasting broth. I also then added in some extra chicken stock I had left in the fridge at the end.

Chicken soup

With the extra concentration of the chicken flavor, the ginger was kind of lost; I probably should have added more ginger to counterbalance the extra stock. Nonetheless, in the end it made a good chicken soup, even if it tasted standard and not ginger-y. But I made a pretty decent broth (round one.)

Round two of cooking chicken stock from scratch was the base for alanabread’s creamy leek and garlic soup. This soup. Oh, what can I say about this soup? This soup is so good that I was licking the spoon as it cooked. Like cake batter. It was, however, very, VERY thick when I only used half the chicken stock I made. (The recipe was supposed to yield double the stock needed for the soup.) I ended up adding all the stock to get the right soup-like consistency. After only half the stock, it was more like a thin mashed potato puree than a soup. (A delicious potato puree, though. I’m totally considering remaking this one, but doctored into mashed potatoes rather than soup. That would be one killer side dish.)

Leek and garlic soup

What makes this soup so OMG is the two bulbs of roasted garlic. Roasted garlic is sweet and aromatic, not spicy and pungent like in its raw form. And it smells amazing. I now highly recommend adding it to everything. Especially anything potato-based.

There’s just the tiniest amount of dairy in this soup, too; most of the creaminess comes from potato, with just 100 ml of light cream added at the end. And it’s heavenly. I think I found my new favorite soup. Also, see installment two of “Why an immersion blender is my best friend.”

With options like this, my post-surgery soft diet is way less boring than run-of-the-mill canned soups and applesauce (and much healthier.) It’s making the whole recovery process much smoother. (No pun intended!)

31-recipe challenge Day 17: Red cabbage, onion and walnut tart

I want to preface this post by saying I mean absolutely no disrespect to Mimi from Manger, who’s cabbage, onion and walnut tart I cooked recently. And while it was undoubtedly one of the prettiest things I’ve ever cooked (it’s purple!), it was, well, unsatisfying. That being said, I don’t eat cooked cabbage, like, ever. I’m the person who orders pizza on St. Patrick’s Day. I don’t even like the way it smells. So I should have known that cooking a dish almost entirely composed of the stuff wouldn’t fare too well. Maybe it’s a French thing. I must just not be sophisticated enough to understand.

Cabbage, onion, walnut tart

Kevin ate a whole slice; I made it through a bite and called it a day–luckily we had already had a leftover pot pie. Possibly more balsamic would have made it better; Kevin suggested a balsamic reduction over the whole thing rather than just two tablespoons. I agree that that may have improved it and kind of covered up the cabbage taste.

All that being said, it’s not a bad recipe for cabbage-lovers. It’s just not a great recipe for non-cabbage fans. It’s one of the only two things I’ve made this month that I’ve ended up throwing out almost in its entirety. (See the pumpkin pie bread pudding) But while that was just poorly made (the squash didn’t cook enough, for one), this came out just fine (it was clearly cooked enough and correctly), I just wasn’t a fan. But Mimi’s recipe was good and very quick and easy, so it’s a great vegetarian weekday entrée or side dish.

Cabbage, onion, walnut tart slice

I served it with crème fraîche and parsley, like she suggested, which definitely complements it well. (What? Just cause I didn’t like it doesn’t mean I can’t tell what flavors do and don’t meld.)

*Side note: Mimi, if you’re reading, HOW did you get it to set up so well? As soon as I sliced this, the veggies fell out everywhere, but yours is so lovely and tidy. What’s your secret?

So, in short…fine recipe, not my taste, so didn’t care for it. But it sure looks nice! (Again, I’m a sucker for anything purple, especially food.)

31-recipe challenge Day 16: Miso-glazed cod

I know there have been a lot of things I’ve written about that I’m not a big fan of but ate anyway, but this was the biggest one. I’ve never, ever been a fish eater. I eat lox (Jewish girl at heart), shrimp and I’ve recently started branching out in my sushi selections. But, for the most part, growing up and into adulthood, I’ve never been a seafood person, and I’ve certainly never eaten a full filet of fish, let alone prepared it. Yet, for this recipe, I did both.

I was literally the dumbest fish buyer ever. I asked the seafood purveyors at ShopRite and Wegmans a million questions, then asked my mom even more about preparing and serving it and determining its freshness and if that “fishy” smell is okay. But now I’ve been de-virginized…in cooking fish.

Miso-marinated cod with rice and broccoletti

This recipe, from the ironically named No Recipes, was originally for miso-glazed black cod, which is apparently extremely hard to find on the east coast. I spent about two weeks asking around and trying to track some down, but when I discovered it could only be ordered in 15-pound cases, it was time for Plan B. After some inquiring, I ended up purchasing Alaskan cod instead, which is a good, mild starter fish. Black cod isn’t even technically cod–it’s sablefish. But, somehow Alaskan cod is readily available on the east coast, but west coast black cod isn’t. Not gonna question it.

The miso-mirin glaze was super quick and easy, and the fish cooked up in no time. The only time-consuming part of this recipe is marinating the cod for one to two days.

And the best part? I liked it! As did Kevin, who eats even less fish than I do. As a matter of fact, I ate most of mine, but left some of the less-marinated parts behind, but Kevin cleared his plate. I think I just added a fish dish to our repertoire. Look at us growing up!

I served it with some white rice and sautéed broccoletti. A quick, healthy satisfying dinner in under 15 minutes. Can’t be beat. And I ate and enjoyed fish! That’s growth, people.

Miso-marinated cod

31-recipe challenge Day 15: Chicken Pot Pie

There’s something so quintessentially wintery and cozy about chicken pot pie.  It’s really the ultimate winter comfort food.  And making my own lets me totally control what goes into it, unlike most of those frozen, pre-made ones from the store.

Chicken pot pie whole

Overall, this was a good recipe, though, of course, I skipped the mushrooms in lieu of an extra pour of chicken stock. Once it was all baked up, I did feel the whole thing could have benefited from some more salt, which is unusual for me, but nonetheless, an extra pinch of salt would’ve brought all the flavors out even more.

I used all white meat in my pot pie, breast specifically. I made chicken soup the same day (more to come on that later), so I used one of the breasts that cooked in the stock. (Multitasking!)

I really wish there was more I could say about this pot pie, other than Kevin loved it and I wish I had more, because it’s still cold and bitter and pot pie weather. But March is so close now, and I’m hoping the mid-Atlantic catches on that March means spring. (One can dream, right?) And I love the whole wheat crust instead of the typical white crust (not that the thought of topping it with biscuit dough hasn’t crossed my mind…yum.)

Chicken pot pie filling

I’m also still suffering from a bit of anesthesia hangover from my wisdom teeth surgery yesterday. On the good side, I’m in very little pain; I’ve only taken two Tylenol and none of the Vicodin the surgeon prescribed. On the downside, I’ve been super tired and groggy since yesterday, and there are solid chunks of time directly post-surgery that I remember NONE of.

I’ve been tucking into all the soup I prepped for myself last week–I’ll have a separate post about that coming soon.

 

31-recipe challenge Day 14: The day I ate a beet and roasted beef

I did two things I’d never thought I’d do on Saturday: I made a roast and I ate a beet.

OK, so maybe that first one wasn’t so out there, but it wasn’t something I foresaw for the near future. There’s something about pulling a big roast of meat out of the oven that makes me feel like I should be wearing heels and pearls with a lace apron and a beehive. Instead I’m pretty sure I was wearing Converse. But the roast was still good.

I pulled out all the stops for a super-fancy (ish) dinner that night, complete with Cesar-crusted roast beef and a blood orange, beet and fennel salad, both courtesy of Bon Appétit.

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Although I ate beets, I’m still not going to be running out to buy them again anytime soon. I discovered I like golden beets more than red beets, but they still have that distinctly “beet” flavor that turns me off. It’s kind of weird, my distaste for beets, seeing as I have a MAJOR sweet tooth and beets are nature’s candy. But I just don’t care for them. I actually ended up tossing the last of the red beet that was leftover after I finished the rest of my salad. The best part was the blood orange, which is just so sweet and citrusy and flavorful.

The only “modification” that I made to this salad, though, was that I halved it. (This doesn’t really even count anymore) and I, in a very uncharacteristic move, forgot the cilantro. Ugh. That probably would’ve made it better, because cilantro makes everything better.

And for those wondering, no, this is NOT the recipe which prompted my disdain for the mandolin. That was the next day…

Now here’s the part where I make a big confession: I didn’t make a roast beef tenderloin, like the recipe says. I made a rib roast. Yes, I know those are VASTLY different. Here’s the (quick) story:

Beef tenderloin (aka chateaubriand) is, apparently, super expensive. (I really should’ve done more research before I dove into this challenge.) I’m talking $50 for a two-pound cut expensive.

Now, I’ve said this once and I’ll say it again: I don’t make that much money! I’m not exactly in a financial position to spend $50 on one roast. So, after some iPhone research and a discussi0n with the butcher, I went with a much more reasonable rib roast instead. It was much fattier, and a different shape, but it was good in the end. Would the tenderloin have been better? Duh, that’s where filet mignon comes from, but I’m not exactly capable of shelling out for four filets.

Another, far more minor tweak, is that I made this gluten-free. Instead of using fresh bread crumbs, I used gluten-free cornflake crumbs so everyone could eat it. I also (surprise, surprise) halved the recipe, because I don’t have eight people to feed. As it is we have about half a roast left over.

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Because of the change in the meat, I had to play around with the cooking time a bit, and just keep watch–and temperature. This taught me the unfortunate lesson that my oven does not cook things evenly. When the roast finally seemed to come to temperature, I took it out of the oven and let it rest a while, but when we finally cut into it, one end was red, nearly rare, while the other was almost all brown, a solid medium at least. Lesson learned: always, ALWAYS rotate things in this oven. (For the record, I was shooting for a nice medium-rare.)

We sliced up the whole thing and seared off the pieces that were on the undercooked side to finish them up.

Now, I’m not a big roast/steak eater, but I must say, this was a pretty lovely piece of meat. It was juicy and still quite tender, considering I used a lesser cut of meat. It got the stamp of approval from the two carnivores, so that’s always good!

I felt like such a big girl, and a classy one at that, pulling off not one, but TWO Bon Appétit recipes and making such a sophisticated meal! Don’t expect it to last.

31-recipe challenge: Where we are and what I’ve learned so far

I’m at the halfway point of my 31-recipe challenge right now. (OK, technically I’m past it, but as far as posting goes, I’m halfway done. So don’t panic, I’m not THAT far behind!) That being said, I think it’s a good time to recap what I’ve done so far and, more importantly, some observations I’ve had along the way.

1. My knife skills are atrocious. Seriously, I’d make a dismal showing in a professional kitchen, and I’d be kicked right off any kind of cooking show. Robert Irvine would kick my ass.

2. Mandolins are dangerous. And now I’m officially scared of them. They seem nifty and convenient, saving you so much time, effort and onion-induced tears…til they slice your thumb open. Yeah, that happened. Granted, it took me 17 days to get any kind of notable injury, so that’s worth something.

3. I’m finally getting opportunities to wear my Wizard of Oz apron! And yet, I’m not taking them nearly often enough. I need to learn to cover up, especially when oil or butter is cooking, or risk my clothes.

4. I need to get a Dutch oven or a similar stove-to-oven vessel. There’s nothing more frustrating than making a one-pot wonder dish only to realize you actually need to use (and wash) two pots.

5. On that note…I’m already sick of doing dishes. I’ve seriously done more dishes in the last few weeks than I have since I moved in.

6. I also never want to see the inside of a supermarket again. I think I’ve spent more time in the supermarket than I have in my own home.  And yet, despite how much time I’ve spent in Wegmans and my (new) local ShopRite, I still don’t know my way around them.

7. I’m going broke. I’m spending easily $100 a week on this, often more. (I know many people will say that’s not much, but I’m not feeding a family of 4 every week. Just me, Kevin, sometimes my mom, occasionally a group. And that’s including very few regular groceries. Usually I’m just buying ingredients and a few staples, like Greek yogurt, apples and face wash.) My credit card’s pretty much ready for this challenge to be over. (So is Kevin, truthfully, especially because we’re looking to move within the next two months.)

8. I need more tupperware. I’m running out of containers (and fridge space) to keep all my leftovers.

9. Nonetheless, there IS a great bright side to all of this! I’m learning so much, cooking things I never thought I would (and more often than not, they’re way easier than I expected) and eating new things I didn’t think I’d like (and sometimes still don’t.) It’s branching me out, and I’m developing a great working repertoire of recipes. There are already multiple things I’ve said I have to cook again.

And now, some housekeeping:

Well, as is life (especially mine), things come up when you don’t expect them. In this case, those “things” would be my wisdom teeth, and they have to come out. On Friday. So, I’m having oral surgery to get all four wisdom teeth out on Friday morning. Obviously, that’s going to leave me out of commission for a few days, so I’m making an executive decision: I’m cutting one recipe from the challenge to make up for lost time. And, if you’ve been following the challenge from the beginning, I bet you know which one it is. Yup, the duck confit is out. (Because that also saves me about $80. Yes, $80 on one meal. I had to be peeled off the floor.) But, in all honesty, losing those few days would make it really, really hard to finish. So I came to this decision.

Luckily, there are quite a few soup recipes in the list, and an AMAZING sounding pudding recipe, so I’ve been prepping some of those this week to carry me through the post-surgery weekend ahead. I have a feeling I’ll be surviving on soup, smoothies and pudding for at least the weekend.

Where we are so far, aka what I’ve made so far:

Sausage and pepper pizza
Pomegranate, apple and kale salad
Sweet potato tacos with avocado
Beer and bacon butterbeans
Five-cheese baked rigatoni
Pumpkin pie bread pudding
Butternut squash and kale salad
Butternut panzanella salad
Vegetarian chili
Apricot and pistachio granola
Sweet potato risotto
Banana bread oatmeal
Gluten-free eggplant parmesan
Chicken rosemary lasagna
Cauliflower curry
Swedish meatballs
Soba noodles

Well, that’s where we are so far. I’ll do another roundup at the end of the challenge to recap the whole ordeal and look at how it all went. what I learned, how I did. For now…more recipes.

 

31-recipe challenge Day 13: Soba Noodles

Well, folks, this is pretty much the halfway point! And what better way to commemorate than soba noodles?

Why soba? Well, because who doesn’t love a steaming hot bowl of noodles?

Soba noodles

These soba noodles from Pickled Plum were probably my most “exotic” recipe yet. I mean that in the sense of the ingredients. I spent more time in the international aisle for this recipe than for any other, and, in the end, some adjustments had to be made. I couldn’t find certain things on the list, like fish cakes (okay, not that I really looked that hard…) and ichimi pepper. But luckily, I found out ichimi is basically just a hot Japanese chili pepper, so I used a little chili powder instead.  I almost couldn’t find the dried fish flake (katsuo bushi) for the sauce, but I found an unfortunately large package of it at the last minute.

I ended up halving the amount of fish flake in the sauce because I was afraid it would impart too much of a fishy flavor, because when I opened that package, whoa baby was it fishy! But I think the full two tablespoons actually would’ve been fine. The flavor seems way milder than the smell.

To be completely honest, I don’t think what I bought were truly soba noodles. I bought rice flour and buckwheat vermicelli (soba are buckwheat), but I don’t think that’s actually the same thing. Close enough though, right? These were great gluten-free noodles, though. I gave the rest to my mom to try because I liked them better than most gluten-free pasta substitutes I’ve tried (like brown rice pasta), and they were cheap. I have a bunch of sauce and toppings left, so I’ll probably go buy actual soba noodles and make it again.

Soba bowls

This dish was an unbridled success. It took only as long as it took to heat up the sauce and boil the noodles, so basically no longer than any other pasta. Plus, it’s warm and cozy and totally customizable–add pretty much whatever you want with as much or as little sauce as you want. You could totally add chicken, pork, shrimp or fish to this and make it a more filling meal. We went with grated ginger, grated daikon (a large, white, Asian radish), chopped scallions and cilantro. I also spent way too much time in the international aisle at Wegmans hunting down nori, found some, and then forgot to add it to the soba. Oops. It’s there for next time. (Confession: I ate this along with pizza. Not traditional and very weird, but it was there and I love pizza. Sue me.)

Truth be told, I’m leaving the wasabi out next time. I thought I just put the smallest bit in, but holy cow! I couldn’t finish my bowl–I gave it to Kevin. It was SO spicy. (To me, anyway, but we all know I’m a spice wimp.) Anyway, next time I’m just saying “no” to wasabi.

Wasabi or no wasabi, soba is a great cold winter day meal or home sick meal, because it’s so cozy and warming and a fun alternative to the usual pasta or soup. And it’s quick! (And if you have a cold or sinus infection, just mix a little extra wasabi in there and BAM! Sinuses cleared.)

So go cozy up with a bowl of soba…what are you waiting for??

Soba noodles 2

31-recipe challenge Day 12: Swedish Meatballs

I promise mine turned out better than that.  They didn’t bounce, for one thing. I’m also pretty sure those aren’t actually Swedish meatballs–regular meatballs made by a Swedish chef don’t count! But he’s a Muppet, so we’ll let it slide!

Anyway, clearly what that guy was trying to tell you is that for my 12th day and 14th recipe of the challenge (almost at the halfway point!), I made Swedish meatballs from Jo Cooks!

All in all, they’re pretty simple (and pretty not-so-good for you…fried meatballs in a butter and sour cream sauce!). I’d certainly make these again, but I think next time I’ll bake the meatballs instead of fry them (save where I can.)

I pretty much followed this recipe exactly, except I used wheat bread instead of white bread (because it’s what I had), and I lost my allspice (seriously, I have NO idea where it went…not happy), so I omitted it.

Meatballs cooking

I had these for lunch the next day along with leftover cauliflower curry.  It was quite the diverse lunch, yet they went together oddly well.

I have a ton of these leftover now, but I have a hunch they will freeze well, and who doesn’t love homemade Swedish meatballs on a whim?

Confession: my first Swedish meatball experience was the frozen, Lean Cuisine version. These are way better than that.  Freeze them in individual portions, and I have my very own homemade version! (Though more cuisine, less lean.)

Swedish meatballs

When I made these and had them for lunch the next day, I ate them on their own, but they would be FANTASTIC over some buttery egg noodles. Granted, anything would be fantastic over buttery egg noodles.

And these are a *tad* more authentic than the Swedish chef’s. Except there’s no possibility that Kermit will come be my sous chef…bummer.

 

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